COWBOY’S EPIC GIFT: 11,000 ACRES RESERVED FOR WILD MUSTANG HORSE SANCTUARY!

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RIDING INTO FREEDOM: COWBOY CARVES OUT 11,000 ACRES FOR WILD MUSTANG SANCTUARY! 🤠🐎

Dayton O. Hyde, an American cowboy, battled his neighbors and the law but never gave up. He is widely recognized for being an author, an environmentalist, and a supporter of horses. Hyde spent a lot of time and work creating the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary in South Dakota.

Hyde was a rodeo photographer before he became a cowboy. When he traveled to Nevada in 1987 to buy cattle, he learned that the federal government was imprisoning wild horses. This was the beginning of his effort to save wild Mustangs. When Hyde arrived, he was appalled to see wild horses being held captive by the federal authorities. The cowboy felt that removing wild horses from their natural environment and corralling them was just too cruel.

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Hyde, who has loved horses since he was a child, was determined to save these untamed Mustangs. He set out to create a sanctuary where these adorable creatures might live in peace. But it was not a straightforward journey, and Hyde had to battle hard to get there.

After hearing about Hyde’s plan, Governor George Mickelson volunteered to show Hyde some land he might utilize as a sanctuary. The property was situated in the Chilson Canyon in the Southern Black Hills, next to the Cheyenne River. Hyde and Mickelson agreed to work together despite strong resistance from the community and municipal officials.

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In the 2013 documentary Running Wild: The Life of Dayton O. Hyde’s trailer, a cowboy is heard stating, “If you say it can’t be done, then that’s the wrong thing to say.”

When Hyde founded The Institute of Range and the American Mustang (IRAM) in 1988, he took the first steps toward realizing his concept.

America’s wild horses are conserved and protected by the IRAM, a nonprofit organization. The Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary started receiving horses that autumn.


More : https://bestuneed.com/2023/10/18/there-is-limited-space-for-wild-horses-both-on-and-off-range/


Prairie Lark, a sweet two-year-old blue roan filly, was among the first Mustangs to enter the refuge. Together with Prairie Lark, Hyde visited the sanctuary and let go a large number of horses.

Hyde ultimately devoted his whole life to ensuring that those wild horses may ride securely every day, shielding them from an unknowable future.

Additionally, according to Hyde, the sanctuary is staffed “seven days a week; without pay or vacations.”

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Before dying death on December 22, 2018, at the age of 93, Hyde had a full life. He has been referred to as “the cowboy,” “the warrior,” and “the most lethal man in American conservation.”

At the huge 11,000-acre Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary, where hundreds of Mustangs still graze freely, Hyde’s impact is still felt today.

Spanish, Choctaw Indians, Curly Horses, and American Mustangs are just a few of the endangered lineages and bands that IRAM continues to spearhead efforts to save.

Also similar: Rescued and Thriving: 200 Horses Find Love and Life at a Beautiful Sanctuary